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Search Results 0 to 26 of about 27 (some duplicates have been removed)
. time for citi price rewind. because your daughter really wants that pink castle thing. and you really don't want to pay more than you have to. only citi price rewind automatically searches for the lowest price. and if it finds one, you get refunded the difference. just use your citi card and register your purchase online. have a super sparkly day! ok. [ male announcer ] now all you need is a magic carriage. citi price rewind. start saving at citi.com/pricerewind. neural speeds increasing to 4g lte. brain upgrading to a quad-core processor. predictive intelligence with google now complete. introducing droid dna by htc. it's not an upgrade to your phone. it's an upgrade to yourself. >>> welcome back, everyone. we now know what sentinelson mandela to the hospital. he is being treated for a lung infection. mandela, 94 years old. checked into a hospital over the weekend. is he responding to treatment. >>> former imf chief dominique strauss khan, settled a lawsuit filed by a new york city hotel maid accused him of sexual assault. the terms of at agreement not disclosed. but diallo seeking u
households in date city in kawauchi village. not all households may decide to return. radiation levels remain above the international level of 1 millisievert per year for ordinary citizens. government officials say they hope to lift the remaining hot spot advisories for 153 households in minami soma city. they are among 104 municipalities in eight prefectures where radiation levels stood at 0.23 microsieverts per hour or higher. administrative officials said radiation levels in the three areas are below that benchmark. a team of foreign experts held its first meeting with representatives of japan's nuclear regulation authority. u.s. and european scientists offered advice on nuclear safety. richard meserve is former chairman of the u.s. nuclear regulatory commission. he says people overseeing the nuclear industry must have technical skills if they are to properly enforce regulations and that those skills must be continuously assesd.d. he f f f f f f should be hired if necessary. andre-claude lacoste is the former head of france's nuclear authority. he say prior to the fukushima accident, the o
covers 129 households in date city in kawauchi village. not all households may decide to return. radiation levels remain above the international level of 1 millisievert per year for ordinary citizens. government officials say they hope to lift the remaining hot spot advisories for 153 households in minami soma city. they are among 104 municipalities in eight prefectures where radiation levels stood at 0.23 microsieverts per hour or higher. administrative officials said radiation levels in the three areas are below that benchmark. a team of foreign experts held its first meeting with representatives of japan's nuclear regulation authority. u.s. and european scientists offered advice on nuclear safety. richard meserve is former chairman of the u.s. nuclear regulatory commission. he says people overseeing the nuclear industry must have technical skills if they are to properly enforce regulations and that those skills must be continuously assessed. he also said foreign staff should be hired if necessary. andre-claude lacoste is the former head of france's nuclear authority. he say p
of the volunteers when we get here has made us feel wonderful and accepted and celebrated. >> there is a lot of city agencies, city departments, divisions that offer up their employees to help us out since overwhelming response, it's unbelievable at how city government works. this is the time that san francisco city employees have really outshined san francisco's clerk's office didn't need to hear from the mayor to say what's your plan. they offered a plan and said here is our strategy. here is what we can do. we can add all of these computers here and there. we can connect our databases, we can expand our capacity by x. we can open up early and stay late and stay open on the weekends. it's unbelievable. we can coordinate all of the training for our volunteers and them in as deputy marriage commissioners and make sure it's signed and certified. that's an example and a model for others. this is -- what happens is when people prove that things can be done, it just raises the bar for what is possible for everyone else. >> it kind of went cooled plan and this is what we planned for. in some respects, pe
afford to escape the city heat and spend summers at the shore. homer's relatives on both sides had been engaged in shipping and trading for generations. his father, charles savage homer, carried on an import business. his mother, henrietta benson homer, was a watercolorist whose flower pictures were occasionally shown in professional exhibitions. winslow was born in boston in 1836. at t age of 21, after two years of drudgery apprenticed to a commercial lithographer, he vowed he would never have another master and set up his studio at 22 winter street, in a building with publisher m.m. ballou. true to his new england background, homer was forthright and self-reliant. above all, he valued his independence, soon establishing himself as a free-lance illustrator for ballou's pictorial. homer's first important illustration was published in 1857, and within a year, his work began to appear in harper's weekly. his early pictures recorded the ordinary manners and pleasures of american life, reflecting a mood of national self-confidence prior to the civil war. his sketch of the skating pond in ce
the city heat and spend summers at the shore. homer's relatives on both sides had been engaged in shipping and trading for generations. his father, charles savage homer, carried on an import business. his mother, henrietta benson homer, was a watercolorist whose flower pictures were occasionally shown in professional exhibitions. winslow was born in boston in 1836. at the age of 21, after two years of drudgery apprenticeto a commercial lithographer, he vowed he would never have another master and set up his studio at 22 winter street, in a building with publisher m.m. ballou. true to his new england background, homer was forthright and self-reliant. above all, he valued his independence, soon establishing himself as a free-lance illustrator for ballou's pictorial. homer's first important illustration was published in 1857, and within a year, his work began to appear in harper's weekly. his early pictures recorded the ordinary manners and pleasures of american life, reflecting a mood of national self-confidence prior to the civil war. his sketch of the skating pond in central park was publi
, as every city has. you certainly will not have any of those bankers wearing bowler hats and numberless. more to the point, london out is tremendously diverse. paris is becoming in admitting that it is more a diversity, and there's a little line for me quite hidden away the says i'm very much a parisian or i'm interested in parisian women, but not quite sure that i ever met a parisian woman. what do you mean by that? >> what i mean is that my education, i have been looking at old movies that i love. we speak about the reputation of the parisian, which was supposed to dress very well. i think that, you know, in france, the eccentricity -- for me, eccentricity is very chic and it is what i love. it is so much about the good taste, which paralyzed. it is still a city where everybody meets profession, sure, but it is sad that you did not seek only may be in the young people, but you do not see when people are in the rain, let's say, in society, like having the joy to address. like you have to be like the color of the street of paris. you ought not to be remarkable. it is very demanding of t
plantation. there were no villages and towns and cities in the north. in the north people could free slaves with opportunities in manufacturing where they could learn skills and trades. couldn't do that in the south. the only opportunity for work or for field hands and when the cotton gin was invented, and that absorbed all the slaves unskilled laborer and you now have i plantation owner, this rather cruel lower middle income people buying property in planting cotton prior to that, most of the poor whites in the south were against slavery because the slaves competed with them for jobs. but unlike most politicians come he put his political career on the line in favor of abolition. >> he was the first to stand up and he led the fight turned his congressional career, which really began after his presidency. he failed to be really did to the presidency. you brought this up before because he didn't have the common touch. he believed it was the need for dignity of a presidential candidate to go stumping out in the countryside and make promises to people he knew he couldn't keep and unfortunately
. >>> and find out how city index has taken a group of individuals with no financial market experience and turned them into successful traders. we'll hear from the winner of this year's competition who is a trainee taxi driver. we'll hear from foreign central european bank chief jean-claude trichet. he spoke with stefan pedrazzi about whether he believes there are any reasons to be optimistic about greece. >>> and whether volatility triggered by uncertainty over the fiscal cliff should be hear to stay. the fiscal cliff seems to be here to stay, at least. house speaker john boehner has scrapped the deal on plan b. boehner conceded last night he didn't have enough support from republicans to pass the bill which would raise taxes on households making more than $1 is million a year. the house is now in recess until the end of the year. the white house says the president's main priority now is to ensure taxes goes go up for 98% of americans and 97% of small businesses. for more on the tax, we're joined. talk about the cliff. you wake up to the news this morning. what do you make of it? what do you do
to another plantation. there were villages and towns and cities in the north come in and in the north people could read the slaves. there were opportunities in manufacturing where they could learn skills and serve as apprentices and learn skills and trades. couldn't do that in the south. the only opportunity for work was field hands, and then when it caught him chain was invented -- cotton shane was invented, you now have a sort of patrician of plantation owners. middle and lower-income people buying property and planting cotton. prior to that, most of the poor whites in the south were against slavery because the slaves compete for jobs. >> unlike most politicians he put his political career on the line in favor of abolition. he was the first to stand up for emancipation and he led the fight throughout his congressional career which began after his presidency. he failed to be reelected and the presidency because he didn't have the common touch. he believed that there was beneath the dignity of a president shall candidate to go out in the countryside and make promises to people that he knew h
's a matter of taking a chance. >> reporter: some city cab have a light drivers can activate, signaling to the public they need help, but there's no guarantee that someone will see it in time. >> even if somebody calls, you could still be attacked before somebody actually get the cops. >> reporter: the chairman of the dc taxi commission is pushing for taxi smart meter system, which would include a new panic button for dc cabs. >> a safety device, which would allow a driver, if they are attacked or threatened, to push a button that would immediately summon police. >> reporter: the smart meter system would also include credit card machines. >> reducing the cash and having immediate access to help will go a long way to reducing assaults on drivers and passengers. >> reporter: for now, many drivers try to stick together and watch each other's backs. >> we either follow each other or we stay on the phone so that we know where we are and we always tell each other where we are going. >> reporter: and some drivers say they avoid the late shift all together. >> because of security. >> how late d
's three forms vertebrae was set in front of the city hall. completed in 1978, it was his last major public work. then in his 80s, henry moore worked on as long as his health allowed him to. he died in 1986 and was buried in the much hadham parish churchyard. some critics still wonder if moore's remarkable success mighhaept tin his n newer directions. others disagree. oh, i thinore's success was always good for hi it may be bad for his reputation, but it wasn't bad for him, his ego, and the ego that was needed to make his work. success was needed in order to fuel the possibilities of a work that appeals to every man. (narrator) henry moore's legacy is still being debated, but what he achieved is beyond controversy. the early works combine a poetic gift for carving and a respect for craftsmanship that drew inspiration from a world wider and older than europe. his fascination with the body and the play of internal and external forms inspired radical abstractions, part dreamscape, part landscape. his later works, more ambitious in size, are essays in the old tradition of making art for public
was dragging mr. brown from the vehicle. >> reporter: this comes one week after kansas city chiefs linebacker jovan belcher killed his girlfriend, kasandra perkins, before turning the gun on himself at the team's practice facility. >> you were visiting somebody at these apartments? >> this newly-released video taken hours before the vicious murder shows police responding to a 911 call about a suspicious man sleeping in his car for more than two hours. >> do you live here? you need to go upstairs, dude. we're trying to cut you a break. >> reporter: according to reports, belcher was out with another woman that night before falling asleep in his bentley. five hours later, police receive another call about belcher. this time with a gun. this video shows an officer carefully approaching the suicide scene outside the chiefs stadium. >> i have cars everywhere kind of staging. i'm just trying to get an eye from afar. >> reporter: the question now, could perkins' death and belcher's suicide have been prevented? at 3:00 a.m., officers had no grounds to arrest him. with no signs of alc
. at the end of that first week, new york city came to him and said, 'mr. morgan, we can't meet our payroll obligations and we're gonna be bankrupt by monday.' and he managed to manufacture $100 million of clearinghouse certificates that essentially kept new york city going through the weekend. c-span: how much... >> guest: it's an amazing story. c-span: ... how much money was he worth when he died at 75 years? >> guest: approximately $80 million. that's a little low, because it was for estate --valued for estate purposes. there was no federal estate tax at the time, but there was a new york state inheritance tax. but it was under $100 million. c-span: how much is that worth today? >> guest: well, you have to multiply by 15 or 20. so if we say it's a $100 million, it would be about $1.5 million to $3 billion. and so it was a lot of money, but not nearly as much as people imagined and not as much as other wealthy men at the time had. morgan had bought out andrew carnegie when he put together us steel in 1901, for $480 million, which carnegie personally got half, so $240 million in 1901. morg
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sponsored by rose communications from our studios in new york city, this is charlie rose. >> rose: andy warhol is considered by many to be the most important artist of the 21st century, though critics and artist debate the meaning of his work, few question his impact on contemporary art. this is the subject of of the metropolitan musician exhibition called "regarding warhol: 60 artists, 50 years." it showcases 45 works by warhol alongside 1200 works by 60 other artists influenced by him. joining me are two curators, mark rosenthal and marla prather. also are three of the artists featured in the show: jeff koons john currin and my good friend chuck close. i'm pleased to have all of them here at this table. let me start with you, mark. somebody once said to me great books begin with a question. do great exhibitions begin with a question? >> well, that's what i hope. the question here is, is andy warhol the most impactful artist? >> rose: impactful rather than important? >> i prefer that. i prefer that because i think of his effect being like a meteor hitting the earth and changing climact
mentioned this happening in other cities, including new york. >> absolute lit. if all the rooftops in chicago were green, they would say around a million pounds of energy per year. in london, if we look at the scale of things, we're looking at 2 million. >> and we're showing the highlight in new york, this being one example of a rooftop park. one issue it seems is trying to figure out whether to impose this from the top down or let individual companies and businesses come around on their own. do you get the sense there's some momentum or transaction here or would you prefer to see this imposed on them, so to speak? >> oh, i think people have to want it and generally get involved. but sometimes it's about knowing what the benefits are and actually understanding it. i think in terms of cutting energy footprints, that's going to be good and, obviously, something that government is pushing quite hard. so like it or not, i think sooner or later, people will have to get engaged. >> and we just hope it doesn't throw santa off too much when he sees that. thank you very much. >> thank you.
developed regulations. i heard the mayor of a fairly large city talk about what he had learned as a mayor. he had been a central government official before and he realized once you got there, a central government officials do not understand a lives of ordinary people. and then he had to watch the proceedings and the process of drafting the local administrative procedure regulation and he came to understand the importance of procedural justice. that was one of the first times in 35 or 40 years of going to china that i heard a chinese talk about procedural justice. the term is in the vocabulary. i think local experimentation may have the least helped in the increment the building of the change of legal culture. >> that is supposed to be one of the virtues of one of the american federal systems. the laboratories of the experiment. one problem with having the population of 1.3 billion, it is a large population. one virtue is that you can divided into provinces and you can have real experiments. try this over here and try that over there. that is a tremendous virtue. i read in your book, you h
relationship with i. m. pei continued. in dallas, moore's three forms vertebrae was set in front of the city hall. completed in 1978, it was his last major public work. then in his 80s, henry moore worked on as long as his health allowed him to. he died in 1986 and was buried in the much hadham parish churchyard. some critics still wonder if moore's remarkable success mighhaept fr ting his n newer directions. others disagree. oh, i thinore's success was always good for hi it may be bad for his reputation, but it wasn't bad for him, his ego, and the ego that was needed to make his work. success was needed in order to fuel the possibilities of a work that appeals to every man. (narrator) henry moore's legacy is still being debated, but what he achieved is beyond controversy. the early works combine a poetic gift for carving and a respect for craftsmanship that drew inspiration from a world wider and older than europe. his fascination with the body and the play of internal and external forms inspired radical abstractions, part dreamscape, part landscape. his later works, more ambitious in size,
Search Results 0 to 26 of about 27 (some duplicates have been removed)